How We Remember
How We Remember

How We Remember

Remembrance takes many forms. It can be large and immensely moving, eg  Bloodswept Lands and Seas of Red, the powerful installation at the Tower of London, Or a family remembering an ancestor who served in the Great War or a handmade poppy made by a small child.

The important thing is we must not forget the sacrifices made.

Remembering together

Remembering together

The major art installation Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red at the Tower of London, marked one hundred years since the first full day of Britain's involvement in the First World War. Created by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper, 888,246 ceramic poppies progressively filled the Tower's famous moat between 17 July and 11 November 2014. Each poppy represented a British military fatality during the war.

When the installation ended, two parts - the Wave and the Weeping Window - set off an a nationwide tour. The image shows 'The Wave' at Lincoln Castle.  A crowd of people listen attentively as the guide explains to them about the installation, and tells stories about the war.

Solitary contemplation

Solitary contemplation

Another large, and powerful, artwork is Eleven-O-One (1101) - more commonly known as Tommy. Positioned on the promenade at Seaham, Co Durham, this 9.5ft tall seated figure was created by North East artist Ray Lonsdale to mark the moment the guns fell silent - one minute past eleven, 11 November 1918.

Remembrance Sunday, 2016. A woman stands alone looking at the scarlet painted stones laid in the shape of a poppy, lost in her own thoughts.

A family remembers

A family remembers

A Field of Remembrance on Remembrance Sunday in Seaham.  Tributes are paid to a Grandfather who survived the war, despite his injuries, and a 19 year old boy who died, possibly at the Somme, in 1916

A child's tribute

A child's tribute

A contrast to the mass produced poppies.  A small child in a nursery school made this one. She wouldn't understand, but she knew it was for Tommy and knew he was a soldier.  Perhaps the memory will stay with her as she grows up