The Butte de Warlencourt
The Butte de Warlencourt

This small insignificant hill was seen as a prize by both sides and changed hands many times.  Many lives on both sides were lost fighting over it

 

Ammunition from the war is regularly dug up by farmers ploughing their fields and sits in a heap by the side of the track until the appropriate authorities remove it.

Crosses on the summit of the Butte de Warlencourt

Crosses on the summit of the Butte de Warlencourt

The Butte de Warlencourt with memorials to the Durham Light Infantry and South Africans visible, 20 September 1917.

© IWM (Q 78163)

 

Waymarker

Waymarker

At a distance, this looks like a wayside cross, erected in memory of those who fell at the Butte. Closer inspection reveals it is a footpath sign. Farmers have dumped amunition here, alongside the path. It will remain there until someone removes it.

A deadly harvest

A deadly harvest

A deadly reminder of the battles fought, and lives lost, during the Battles of the Somme

Looking towards the Butte de Warlencourt

Looking towards the Butte de Warlencourt

From this distance, the Butte looks insignificant. Yet, around a million men, on all sides, were injured or killed during the various battles which took place for this small hill. As can be seen, many of the casualties are buried in the Warlencourt cemetery.

A scene of desolation

A scene of desolation

Looking over the ploughed fields

Looking over the ploughed fields

Despite the deadly history, and amunition still in the ground, these fields are ploughed regularly.